Tim Warren (High School 9-1-1 )

Tim Warren was a member of Darien EMS–Post 53, a student run ambulance service, from 1982 to 1985 and served as the organization’s VP of Operations his senior year of high school. He has such an incredible appreciation for “The Post,” and the opportunity and responsibility he was given as a teenager, that it motivated him to make High School 9-1-1. Today, he runs his own production company that produces narrative films, documentaries and reality programming. Tim has spent the last two decades as an Executive Producer/Show Runner, overseeing 100’s of people at a time, on shows like Extreme Makeover: Home Edition and Bar Rescue. He is also a multi-camera director having twice been nominated by The Director’s Guild of America for his work on SPIKE’s Ink Master and Pros vs. Joes. While he didn’t go into the medical field, the life skills Tim learned in Post 53—making quick decisions under extreme stress, working with others and just plain not giving up—have been invaluable to him. Tim hopes that you enjoy the film, and to quote Post 53’s Founder, Bud Doble, “Assume Nothing.”

About the Film

Filmmaker: Tim Warren
Runtime: 86 min

Synopsis:
High School 9-1-1 chronicles a year in the life of the only ambulance service in Darien, Connecticut that just happens to be run by high school teenagers?! This one-of-a-kind organization services 20,000 residents 365 days a year, 24/7 and responds to over 1500 emergency calls annually. The foundation of Darien EMS–Post 53 is the empowerment of young people through adult and peer mentorship. “Posties” are taught a multitude of managerial, critical thinking and emergency medical skills and then given the responsibility to implement what they have learned by actually running their own EMS organization. The goal of the film is to inspire and empower young people as well as motivate the adults in their lives—parents, educators, school administrators, community leaders—to create opportunities for them to learn by doing and make a difference in their communities. In short, empowered teens are happy teens and happy teens are productive teens that can go on to accomplish great things.

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